can you have cervical cancer without having the HPV virus?

by Rachel on July 27, 2011

If so, what are other ways you can have cervical cancer?
Please no nasty remarks, be mature about this.
Sweetie, i see you’re trying to help, but i am not promiscuous. I’ve only ever been with one guy, and I have been with him for 7 years, thank you very much.

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Tarkarri July 27, 2011 at 11:09 am

Cervical cancer is possible without having the HPV virus, just a lot less likely.

Regular Pap smears is the best way to get early detection.

Early detection leads to early treatment with the best possible outcome.

Even someone who is 100% celibate can develop cervical cancer.

Denisedds July 27, 2011 at 11:10 am

Yes it is possible to get cervical cancer without HPV.
HPV is not the cause of cancer. No one knows what causes cancer.
HPV is a risk factor for cervical cancer and it is not the only one.
Cervical cancer is not very common with only about 12,000 cases each year.

shelley_gaudreau2000 July 27, 2011 at 11:15 am

Borrowed this from your National Cancer Institute.
Risk Factors

When you get a diagnosis of cancer, it’s natural to wonder what may have caused the disease. Doctors cannot always explain why one woman develops cervical cancer and another does not. However, we do know that a woman with certain risk factors may be more likely than others to develop cervical cancer. A risk factor is something that may increase the chance of developing a disease.

Studies have found a number of factors that may increase the risk of cervical cancer. For example, infection with HPV (human papillomavirus) is the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV infection and other risk factors may act together to increase the risk even more:

* HPV infection: HPV is a group of viruses that can infect the cervix. An HPV infection that doesn’t go away can cause cervical cancer in some women. HPV is the cause of nearly all cervical cancers.

HPV infections are very common. These viruses are passed from person to person through sexual contact. Most adults have been infected with HPV at some time in their lives, but most infections clear up on their own.

Some types of HPV can cause changes to cells in the cervix. If these changes are found early, cervical cancer can be prevented by removing or killing the changed cells before they can become cancer cells. The NCI fact sheet Human Papillomaviruses and Cancer: Questions and Answers has more information.

A vaccine for females ages 9 to 26 protects against two types of HPV infection that cause cervical cancer. The NCI fact sheet Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines: Questions and Answers has more information.

* Lack of regular Pap tests: Cervical cancer is more common among women who don’t have regular Pap tests. The Pap test helps doctors find abnormal cells. Removing or killing the abnormal cells usually prevents cervical cancer.

* Smoking: Among women who are infected with HPV, smoking cigarettes slightly increases the risk of cervical cancer.

* Weakened immune system (the body’s natural defense system): Infection with HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) or taking drugs that suppress the immune system increases the risk of cervical cancer.

* Sexual history: Women who have had many sexual partners have a higher risk of developing cervical cancer. Also, a woman who has had sex with a man who has had many sexual partners may be at higher risk of developing cervical cancer. In both cases, the risk of developing cervical cancer is higher because these women have a higher risk of HPV infection.

* Using birth control pills for a long time: Using birth control pills for a long time (5 or more years) may slightly increase the risk of cervical cancer among women with HPV infection. However, the risk decreases quickly when women stop using birth control pills.

* Having many children: Studies suggest that giving birth to many children (5 or more) may slightly increase the risk of cervical cancer among women with HPV infection.

* DES (diethylstilbestrol): DES may increase the risk of a rare form of cervical cancer in daughters exposed to this drug before birth. DES was given to some pregnant women in the United States between about 1940 and 1971. (It is no longer given to pregnant women.)

Having an HPV infection or other risk factors does not mean that a woman will develop cervical cancer. Most women who have risk factors for cervical cancer never develop it.

So you see HPV is one of a few causes but one that can be prevented.

tarnishedsilverheart July 27, 2011 at 12:10 pm

Virtually all cervical cancers are cause by the human papilloma virus or HPV.

It is the major risk factor for cervical cancer. They are other risk factors such as smoking, having HIV or damage to the immune system, multiple full term baths, young age at first full term pregnancy and poverty. Most women with the virus do not progress to cancer and it isn’t know why some women do have the virus long enough to progress to cancer. Routine Pap testing is the best way to prevent cervical cancer.

In less than 1% cancer of the cervix can be caused by sarcoma, melanoma and lymphoma.
http://www.obgyn.net/gynecological-oncology/articles/sarcomas_uterine_cervix.htm
Human papillomavirus is a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer worldwide

the presence of HPV in virtually all cervical cancers implies the highest worldwide attributable fraction so far reported for a specific cause of any major human cancer.
The human papillomavirus (HPV) has been detected in virtually all invasive cervical cancers and has been confirmed as the major cause of this cancer.
http://adam.about.com/reports/000046_1.htm

HPV infection: HPV is a group of viruses that can infect the cervix. An HPV infection that doesn’t go away can cause cervical cancer in some women. HPV is the cause of nearly all cervical cancers.
http://www.medicinenet.com/cervical_cancer/page2.htm#causes
Almost all (more than 99%) cervical cancers are related to HPV.
http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/CancerCauses/OtherCarcinogens/InfectiousAgents/HPV/HumanPapillomaVirusandHPVVaccinesFAQ/hpv-faq-hpv-and-cervical-cancer

It is now clear that virtually all cervical cancers — more than 99%, according to the American Cancer Society — are related to HPV infection, which is a sexually transmitted virus.
http://www.webmd.com/sexual-conditions/hpv-genital-warts/news/20070101/hpv-test-helps-detect-cervical-cancer
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major risk factor for development of cervical cancer.
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/cervical

The link between infection by HPV and cervical cancer is one of the strongest among all tumors suspected to be related to an infectious agent — using appropriately sensitive techniques, HPV can be isolated in more than 99.7% of cervical cancer cases
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/458995_2
It is well established that chronic infection of cervical epithelium by human papillomaviruses (HPV) is necessary for the development of cervical cancer. In fact, HPV DNA has been demonstrated in more than 99.7% of cervical cancer biopsy specimens, with high-risk HPV16 and HPV18 sequences being most prevalent (45,73). .

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12828864
Virtually all cervical cancer cases (99%) are linked to genital infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), which is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract.
http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/cancers/en/

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